Tweens, Teens & Beyond #32

Good morning and thank you for joining Sharon, Nicky and I for what will be the last Tweens, Teens & Beyond link up of 2017. We will be taking a break at the close of this week's linky on Thursday 14th December and will re-open again on Tuesday 9th January 2018.

What a year it has been and we look back fondly on all we have achieved since our launch earlier this year and look forward to continuing to grow our loyal community further in the New Year, please do help spread the word if you know of someone who might like to join us.

In the meantime, back to the business of last week and our favourite post from last week was Alex at My Lifelong Holiday and her post on a trip to Bilbao with Kids  Whilst Alex headlines her post as a trip with kids her itinerary would perfectly suit those looking for a trip away from kids too!  Just a thought!  It is extremely comprehensive with great tips on where to stay and eat as well as all the must visit attractions such as the Guggenheim which is definitely on my list of galleries to visit.  Do pop over for a read.

Now all that remains is to wish you all a very Happy Christmas and Best Wishes for the New Year and we look forward to welcoming you all back after

Linky Rules

Please could you:

  • Grab the Tweens,Teens & Beyond  badge and add it to the bottom of your post or your side bar by copying the code and adding it into the text version of your post - if you need help read this Linky Guide from Becky at Cuddle Fairy or tweet one of us.
  • Link up one post, old or new (sponsored and review posts are welcome but not other linky's please) that relate to children over the age of 10 years (Tweens, Teens or young adult children) and midlife.
  • Tweet us @motherofteensuk, @DrSharonParry1 and @nickykentisbeer
  • Comment on the hosts' posts and AT LEAST one other of your choice using the linky hashtag #TweensTeensBeyond 
  • Share any posts that you love, we are all about sharing!

What we will do for you:

  • All three of us will comment on your post and share it on Twitter.
  • Your post will be pinned to the #TweensTeensBeyond Linky Pinterest Board
  • Each week, we will select our favourite post which will be featured on all of our sites and shared on Social Media
  • By entering the link you are agreeing to be added to the email reminder list.  (You can request to be removed at any time!)

Mother of Teenagers

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Keeping Your Children Safe Online #WhoIsSam

When did you last talk to your children about staying safe online?  Was it as recently as this week? Or was it last month or even last year?  In an online survey by the National Crime Agency (NCA) 15% of parents hadn't talked to their children for at least 6 months and another 15% had never had the conversation at all.

I can remember the first online safety presentation I attended at my teens' primary school over a decade ago.  Since then there have been countless more throughout the secondary school years, reminding us as parents to stay alert, to continue to monitor our children's online activity and not to sit back on our laurels and think "job done" because it is so easy to do just that isn't it? The problem, however, is that whilst the digital world is advancing so rapidly so too is the resourcefulness of those whose intention is to harm our children.

Where there is a will there is a way and the threat of online sex offenders and their use of live streaming platforms to reach our children with a large number of comments in real time is increasing rapidly.  Once on these platforms, offenders use a variety of techniques to convince young people they are their "secret" friends and then go on to manipulate them to do what they want.

Adequate parental controls on networks and electronic devices are a necessity in every household, but so too is talking to our children frequently about healthy relationships and staying safe online.  It is great that our schools are doing what they can to educate our children about the dangers and the warning signs, but it is vital that we do the same and reinforce the messages not just once but regularly.

#WhoIsSam

With the Christmas holiday on the horizon and no doubt an increase in screen time among children nationwide, the NCA and National Police Chiefs' Council are running a campaign over the coming week to raise awareness among parents of the need to protect their children by talking to them about the kind of behaviour that could put them at risk.

A short animation narrated by a fictional character called Sam and released with the hashtag #WhoIsSam shows how offenders attempt to build relationships with young people online. It is powerful in its simplicity and to the point, just the kind of hard hitting message that is needed.  My daughter's response on viewing it was "That's creepy" and it provided the perfect gateway for us to have a discussion.

Despite my foray into blogging I am still not as technologically savvy as maybe I would like, so when it comes to online security in our house this is handled by my husband whose liberal use of filters has caused a few lively arguments with the teens in the past not least when their internet access was blocked at 9pm and they still had homework to finish.

The chats on the other hand are my territory and although with older teens there is generally a lot of eye-rolling, alongside comments of "I'm not stupid mum!" I am relentless with my questions and supervision of their online behaviour, preferring to always err on the side of caution.

How Often Do You Discuss Online Safety?

Alerted about the #WhoIsSam campaign I questioned my own vigilance and asked some fellow parenting bloggers how often they chat to their children about online safety and how up to date they considered their own knowledge to be.  Here is what they had to say:

"Like it or not my kids are growing up and in an ever changing world filled with technology. I monitor my kids phones, tablets etc and online playing and will do for the foreseeable future but I will also continue to trust them to tell me if something happens. Ironic really that the technology that we are using to communicate is forcing us to communicate more with our children. As a teacher and a blogger I consider myself quite tech savvy. However, I have been caught out by comments made during online games. It shocked me that our kids can be targeted on our own sofas."  Catie, Spectrum Mum

"I’m always chatting to my kids about the dark side of the Internet. I don’t sit them all down to discuss it, its something I just regularly ask them - what they are doing online, who they are talking to and if anyone strange contacts them what to do. They often groan, telling me they know!! It’s a world they need to be aware of, and I don’t hold back on letting them know the dangers. No point sugar coating anything. As for my online knowledge it's as up to date as it ever will be. My kids are way ahead of me on the latest apps out there, but with a good grounding on dangers etc, I’m confident they won't be drawn into anything untoward (at least I hope they wont!) but sometimes, with the best will in the world kids can be hoodwinked." Sharon, Everyone's Buck Stops Here

"I had a conversation with my kids about this just last week. Both are into online games but I don't let the younger son join any gaming groups that have strangers and that do not have his elder brother in. We regularly talk about how adults may pose as children to befriend them. Also, they do not respond to emails, WA messages or any friend requests from anyone unknown. I also check their profiles and emails from time to time. I read regularly about online safety but your query is nudging me to google and learn more about any recent developments or updates." Rachna, Rachna Says

"I’m always dropping comments into conversation about internet safety, only to be met with a wearied “yes mum, I know!” (But it makes me feel better!). I used to think I was internet safety savvy - going to all the talks at the schools etc.. but then I realised that I wasn’t and I’m not. Because with the best will in the world parents can’t keep up with what’s out there. This is why it’s so important that digital citizenship classes take place in schools." Alison, MadHouseMum

"We have an ongoing dialogue about internet safety at home with our kids as well as through their schools. Our kids are not allowed internet enabled devices in their bedrooms, any internet usage happens in public areas of our home.  I don't know how to measure my knowledge.  I'm definitely not as up to date as my 15 year old daughter so when I hear about a new app we discuss it." Liberty, On The Lighter Side

"We had a very good safety awareness talk given to both kids and parents last year at school which made us all more aware of how to keep safe online. I have talked to the kids regularly about it and checked what they're up to and a big rule is they are not allowed to talk to anyone on any of these games they play. I'm hoping the school does the talk every year as it opened our eyes to how easily grown ups can pretend to be other kids and how susceptible the children are. Whole thing still scares me though." Susie, S.H.I.T

"We talk about internet safety often. Really when it comes up in conversation. We do tend to have these types of conversations in the car! I’m pretty up-to-date because we have training at school about internet safety. The children have quite a bit of education on this too in schools. All in all I’m very happy with their internet safety although every time I do a course, I panic because of all the things that could go wrong! It’s v v scary!" Sophie, Old House In The Shires

"It’s actually been a few months since we really had a proper discussion about internet safety. My eldest is thirteen and I was comfortable with her on Instagram as I’m on it also and I can monitor her as well as see that she keeps the setting on private. I also have sign in access so still can delete things if I don’t like what she follows and we can discuss why. When she wanted snap chat I knew nothing about it so I said no. I told her I’d review the decision in a few months time. In general it’s more an ongoing discussion and just having a good trusting relationship with her. I actually have to admit I’m not up to date with online safety. My husband is in IT and so I leave that in his hands, he knows how to monitor what they do online and install safety measures. In saying that though it makes me realise I shouldn’t just rely on him, I really need to get more involved!" Mac, Reflections From Me

"Gosh I think in answer to the 'last time' I probably nag my 13yo on a weekly basis! But this has really made me stop and think. I totally agree with the comment about digital citizenship classes especially as much as I'd love to emulate others' example of not permitting devices in the bedrooms, that is where my kids often do their homework and so much of their schoolwork is internet-dependent. Sadly, just because I'm a blogger and my work means I'm online a huge amount that doesn't translate to me knowing ALL the dangers and loopholes that exist out there." Prabs, Absolutely Prabulous

"About two weeks ago I discussed with my daughter which you tubers she was watching. We had a similar conversation only a month before too. I think I'm reasonably well informed and I know I'm a lot more careful than some of my friends. We don't let the children take as many risks as we might do. I keep them off a few platforms for example but they are never disconnected from their friends so they're happy." Janet, Falcondale Life

"It comes up often at the moment because the phone has only been around since May. At the moment I am more on top of digital matters than my daughter is. No Social Media yet but I think What's App does a very good impersonation. We have already seen the ramifications. In terms of learning about online safety, the school are very much on top of this - well to the extent they can be. We had a very useful session recently which really got me ahead of the game on top of the things I know from being a user."  Nicky, NotJustThe3OfUs

ThinkUKnow

"Knowledge is power" said Sir Francis Bacon and as parents we can never be short of information on how best to protect our children and particularly in this digital world where technology has crept into all our lives so rapidly.

New guidance for both parents and children on the risks posed by live streaming is available from the NCA CEOP's educational website Thinkuknow.  As someone who was previously unfamiliar with this site I can only say to all parents wanting to brush up on their knowledge please do take a look for yourself as it is a truly valuable resource. Information for children is categorised by age from tots to teens and there is also a dedicated area for parents and carers with practical advice and tips on keeping our children safe online.

During a recent week police forces and the NCA arrested 192 offenders on suspicion of child sexual abuse offences.  As parents these figures act as a disturbing reminder that we need to be ever vigilant of the threats to our children and make sure we continue to keep on top of their online behaviour as well as keep our own knowledge up to date.  Monitoring our children online is a necessity not an option.

 

What do you do to keep your children safe online?  How much do you know about online safety?  Do you think you are up to date or could you do more?

 

 

*As featured on HuffPost

 

Mum Muddling Through  Post Comment Love Lucy At Home Blogcrush Week 43 

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Tweens, Teens & Beyond #31

Good morning and thank you for joining Sharon, Nicky and I for another week of Tweens, Teens & Beyond and an opportunity to link up your posts on secondary parenting and lifestyle topics.

Our favourite post from last week was from Liberty On The Lighter Side on the more challenging aspects of bringing up teens with her reflective piece When Can I Resign From Being A Parent?   It is tough sometimes but the love and support of those close to us and a good dose of communication can work wonders.  Do pop over for a read if you missed it.

Now onto this week.

Please take some time to read the rules below before linking and please remember the golden rule of blogging is to share the linky love and remember to comment.  We look forward to reading your posts.

Linky Rules

Please could you:

  • Grab the Tweens,Teens & Beyond  badge and add it to the bottom of your post or your side bar by copying the code and adding it into the text version of your post - if you need help read this Linky Guide from Becky at Cuddle Fairy or tweet one of us.
  • Link up one post, old or new (sponsored and review posts are welcome but not other linky's please) that relate to children over the age of 10 years (Tweens, Teens or young adult children) and midlife.
  • Tweet us @motherofteensuk, @DrSharonParry1 and @nickykentisbeer
  • Comment on the hosts' posts and AT LEAST one other of your choice using the linky hashtag #TweensTeensBeyond 
  • Share any posts that you love, we are all about sharing!

What we will do for you:

  • All three of us will comment on your post and share it on Twitter.
  • Your post will be pinned to the #TweensTeensBeyond Linky Pinterest Board
  • Each week, we will select our favourite post which will be featured on all of our sites and shared on Social Media
  • By entering the link you are agreeing to be added to the email reminder list.  (You can request to be removed at any time!)

Mother of Teenagers

 

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Tweens, Teens & Beyond #30

Good morning and thank you for joining Sharon, Nicky and I for another week of Tweens, Teens & Beyond and another milestone as we move into our thirties.

So Christmas is ever closer and rather than hide under the covers I have decided to join the great and the good in the gift guide blogosphere with a post on must-read books for teens this week, compiled with the help of my bookworm daughter.  If it's not for you then I won't be offended if you pass it by without a comment this week - just give me a retweet instead.

Back to the business of the link-up, the fabulously, gorgeous Laurie at Vanity and Me is our favourite from last week, with her post on a new facial treatment which is apparently guaranteed to make us midlifers glowing again!  As a facial addict this ticked all my boxes and I am adding it to my Christmas list for Mr MoT...so guys before you switch off, take a moment to think of that special woman in your life who may appreciate this as a gift.

Now onto this week.

Please take some time to read the rules below before linking and please remember the golden rule of blogging is to share the linky love and remember to comment.  We look forward to reading your posts.

Linky Rules

Please could you:

  • Grab the Tweens,Teens & Beyond  badge and add it to the bottom of your post or your side bar by copying the code and adding it into the text version of your post - if you need help read this Linky Guide from Becky at Cuddle Fairy or tweet one of us.
  • Link up one post, old or new (sponsored and review posts are welcome but not other linky's please) that relate to children over the age of 10 years (Tweens, Teens or young adult children) and midlife.
  • Tweet us @motherofteensuk, @DrSharonParry1 and @nickykentisbeer
  • Comment on the hosts' posts and AT LEAST one other of your choice using the linky hashtag #TweensTeensBeyond 
  • Share any posts that you love, we are all about sharing!

What we will do for you:

  • All three of us will comment on your post and share it on Twitter.
  • Your post will be pinned to the #TweensTeensBeyond Linky Pinterest Board
  • Each week, we will select our favourite post which will be featured on all of our sites and shared on Social Media
  • By entering the link you are agreeing to be added to the email reminder list.  (You can request to be removed at any time!)

 

Mother of Teenagers

 

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Top Must-Read Books For Teens This Christmas

The blogosphere is awash with Christmas gift ideas and as a family of prolific readers we are always on the look out for a good book.  I have picked my daughter's brains to put together a few recommendations (in no particular order) for the tween or teenage book lover in your house, each with a personal comment from my daughter.

  • Bitter Sixteen : Stefan Mohamed

A story about a sixteen year old boy Stanly Bird from Wales whose best friend is a talking beagle named Daryl.  On his sixteenth birthday, Stanly gains superhero powers of flight and telekinesis and after a series of extraordinary events decides to move to London, only to experience events even more traumatic and terrifying than those he left behind in Wales.  "The perfect combination of funny and supernatural elements with just the right amount of weird horror to keep you on your toes.  A real page turner." 

  • Burn After Writing : Rhiannon Shove

An interactive book that invites the teen reader to face life's big questions "Who are you now? How did you get here? Where are you going?" and to record them as a personal journal.  Divided into three sections The Past, The Present and The Future, the author encourages her readers to have fun with it as there are no right answers and then once they are finished to burn after writing.  "A book for people who like to think and ask questions of themselves and the world they live in.  I loved exploring myself through this book.  It is full of interesting activities and I want to keep it as a reminder of myself as I am now and refer back to it later in life."

  • FanGirl : RainbowPowell

Cath and her sister Wren had always bonded over their love and obsession with Simon Snow, but this all changes when they go to university.  An aspiring writer, with a social anxiety disorder, Cath is abandoned by her sister in favour of a high octane social life and left to her own devices.  The book charts Cath's struggle to branch out alone, a romantic dalliance, a clash with her fiction-writing professor, the betrayal of her writing partner, the psychological break down of her father and her determination to publish her own fan fiction Carry On, Simon.  "Writing is a passion of mine and I loved this story of Cath's pursuit of her dream against all the odds.  A really uplifting novel."

  • Goodbye Stranger : Rebecca Stead

Three friends Bridge, Emily and Tabitha are best friends with just the one rule - no fighting, but seventh grade forces physical and emotional changes upon their friendship group via a series of new experiences.  "Secondary school is a game changer for many friendships.  This is a sensitive portrayal of growing up and raises a number of important questions about staying true to yourself."

  • Life In A Fishbowl : Len Vlahos

The world of fifteen year old Jackie Stone is turned upside down when she discovers her father Jared has been diagnosed with a terminal brain tumour. Jared does not tell his family immediately and decides to auction off what remains of his life on eBay in an attempt to raise money and ease the financial burden of his loss upon his family.  Although the ad is removed, it is not before the highest bidder a reality TV producer, has arranged with Jared to film their lives 24/7.  In a quest to regain her family's privacy and dignity Jackie sets out to end the show.  "Humorous but sad.  A modern day tragicomedy reflecting on unpopularity, family life, reality television and the entertainment industry as a whole." 

  • Me Earl & The Dying Girl : Jesse Andrews

High schooler Greg and his one friend Earl spend all their time making films.  One day he is told by his mother to make friends with Rachel, a childhood friend diagnosed with Leukaemia. Andrews is a comic genius and manages to turn a commonly depressing subject matter into a hilarious story filled with teenage awkwardness, love and friendship at its centre.  "A bizarrely laugh out loud book which makes you have faith in the real power and value of teenage friendship."

  • Say Her Name : James Dawson

A Halloween dare at boarding school between Roberta "Bobbie" Rowe, her best friend Naya and local boy Caine to summon the legendary ghost of Bloody Mary by chanting her name five times in front of a candle-lit mirror at midnight, has unforeseen circumstances.  The words "five days" left on her bathroom mirror the next day start a sequence of events for Bobbie and her friends and a race against time before Bloody Mary comes for them.  "A chilling but witty horror story born out of a seemingly innocent teenage scenario."

  • The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night-Time : Mark Haddon

The tale of a boy detective with autism, this book turned popular West End play, needs little introduction.  15 year old Christopher Boone lives in Swindon with his dad and his pet rat and has never been further than the end of the road until the murder of his neighbour's dog turns him into a detective.  Christopher knows a lot about maths but very little about interacting with people.  His world is logical and he turns to his favourite character Sherlock Holmes for inspiration to track down the dog's killer, which simultaneously brings him face to face with the breakdown of his parent's marriage. The book is funny and sad in equal measure and gives the reader an insight into the clinical world of an emotionally dissociated mind.  "I knew very little about autism before reading this and found the book both enlightening and incredibly moving.  The play is also definitely worth seeing!"  

 

Editor's Note: This is not a comprehensive list but if you have any books to add please do let me know in the comments below - I need new book ideas for Christmas too!  

 

Mum Muddling Through 

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Tweens, Teens & Beyond #29

Good morning and thank you for joining Sharon, Nicky and I for another week of Tweens, Teens & Beyond.

Despite my best efforts to ignore it, the Christmas countdown is well and truly underway and London has gone nuts for sure.  A quick trip up to town yesterday for a presentation had me running back to the tranquility of the commons of South London as soon as I could make an excuse to leave, madness is the only way to describe it!

Back to the business of the link-up, the hilariously funny mum of teens Sharon at Everyone's Buck Stops Here was our favourite from last week, with her post on the hidden treasures of a teenager's room.  Sharon is a loyal linker and having recently revamped her blog is presenting the dramas of life as the mother of teenagers in a fresh and alternative style as a newspaper reporter. She is a comic genius.

Now onto this week.

Please take some time to read the rules below before linking and please remember the golden rule of blogging is to share the linky love and remember to comment.  We look forward to reading your posts.

Linky Rules

Please could you:

  • Grab the Tweens,Teens & Beyond  badge and add it to the bottom of your post or your side bar by copying the code and adding it into the text version of your post - if you need help read this Linky Guide from Becky at Cuddle Fairy or tweet one of us.
  • Link up one post, old or new (sponsored and review posts are welcome but not other linky's please) that relate to children over the age of 10 years (Tweens, Teens or young adult children) and midlife.
  • Tweet us @motherofteensuk, @DrSharonParry1 and @nickykentisbeer
  • Comment on the hosts' posts and AT LEAST one other of your choice using the linky hashtag #TweensTeensBeyond 
  • Share any posts that you love, we are all about sharing!

What we will do for you:

  • All three of us will comment on your post and share it on Twitter.
  • Your post will be pinned to the #TweensTeensBeyond Linky Pinterest Board
  • Each week, we will select our favourite post which will be featured on all of our sites and shared on Social Media
  • By entering the link you are agreeing to be added to the email reminder list.  (You can request to be removed at any time!)

 

Mother of Teenagers

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Teaching  Children to Take Academic Responsibility

Guest Post

Claire Adams is a regular contributor in the blogosphere and I have always enjoyed her writing so was delighted when she asked if she could guest post for me.  For those of you who haven't come across her before, Claire is a personal and professional development expert who believes that a positive attitude is one of the keys to success. You can find her online writing and giving tips about lifestyle and development as a regular contributor at highstylife.com.

Teaching our children the value of an inquiring mind is a cause close to my heart.  It is a stepping stone to independent learning and here Claire pursues this and shows us how we as parents can teach our children to take academic responsibility. 

From a very early age, children have a tendency to identify with some segments of their lives and to completely disregard others that they don’t find appealing, or that don’t resonate with them. Education for the large part seems to children like a forced responsibility, as if they would rarely opt for going to school in the first place if it were up to them – but it doesn’t necessarily have to be that way.

It starts when you encourage them to think for themselves and question everything, not blindly accept what they’re presented with, thus helping them embrace the value of learning through thinking, as opposed to merely absorbing information. But in order to own up to their success, failures (of equal value) and choices, our role as parents can be a pivotal one.

Provide perspective early on

While they are still in primary school, children have a tendency to view everything through creativity and play – which opens up wonderful opportunities for creative thinking, problem solving and independent thought development. However, as they step into their tween and teen years, context becomes all the more relevant for them to understand why they are making an effort in the first place.

Not to impress others (us, their parents included), or to get a satisfactory number on a piece of paper, but to enrich their lives, broaden their horizons and, most importantly, equip them for their life ahead.

This is a time when their childhood dreams of becoming astronauts or vets can be brought to life with the right choices. So, talk to them, tell them your own experience, and ask them if they see value in what they are taught at school, how those skills and knowledge can help them succeed later in life.

Know when to step aside or in

Mothers know all too well, how tempting it is to bring out our Wonder Woman self and bring hell to anyone or anything who tries to harm our kids. But they often need us to do something else, they need us not to bail them out, and not to solve their problems for them. Facing responsibility, consequences as well as achievements is essential for their future choices. Ultimately, they need to learn we should all clean up our own mess.

Then again, certain warning signs may indicate that it’s time for an honest one-on-one, if you see they’re frustrated, slipping with their work, showing no sign of positive engagement, or that their behaviour has changed. Help them by teaching them to view this as an opportunity to grow, a positive challenge to learn or improve their time-management skills and overcome their limitations.

Teach them to ask for help

Teens are relentless independence-seekers, and they might find the school work difficult, but they will often avoid admitting they need help. Fostering this independence is commendable, as long as it results in them taking action and developing problem-solving and proper coping techniques, but if they are truly stuck, they need to understand the value of asking for help or guidance, whether that is from their parents or their teachers. Not everything is everyone’s strong suit.

Once they realize that temporary help is another way towards greater independence, they will be more inclined to seek help to overcome learning obstacles. They need a stimulating learning environment that cultivates critical thinking, and offers the tools to handle academic challenges properly, and we all know that’s not easy to come by.

Focus on commitment

I’ll never forget our neighbours daughter’s violin recitals and the hours she would spend playing and perfecting her skills in the days and months before the performance. She was a hard worker and a gifted child, but her stage-fright was so severe she would often freeze on stage or play poorly despite all her practice. Her mother would always praise her, not falsely for the poor performance, but for all the effort she had previously invested in her playing.

Our childrens' grades, teachers’ comments and results often won’t correspond to the amount of work they invest in their studies – they will sometimes do brilliantly well despite poor studying, but they will sometimes fail despite doing their absolute best. Commend them for their dedication, discipline and effort, not merely the end result. This way they will learn how to value their effort above other people’s judgement and they will learn not to give up at the first sign of trouble in their later academic years.

Claire Adams:

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JakiJellz 

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Tweens, Teens & Beyond #28

Good morning, it's that time of the week again when Sharon, Nicky and I look forward to your posts about all things Tween, Teen & Young Adult related as well as any burning lifestyle issues you would like to share.

Our favourite post from last week was Rachna and her post on Tween Tantrums: How To Handle Them.  I am glad to say that this phase is behind me now but that is not to say the agony of it is far from my memory.

It is a difficult transitioning period for all involved and requires patience and diplomacy in bucket loads.  Rachna sounds like she has the situation well and truly under control and her advice will no doubt provide a useful reference for any parent who still has all this to come.  Do take a read if only to heave a sigh of relief that you survived and share any pearls of wisdom of any you own.

Now onto this week.

Please take some time to read the rules below before linking and please remember the golden rule of blogging is to share the linky love and remember to comment.  We look forward to reading your posts.

Linky Rules

Please could you:

  • Grab the Tweens,Teens & Beyond  badge and add it to the bottom of your post or your side bar by copying the code and adding it into the text version of your post - if you need help read this Linky Guide from Becky at Cuddle Fairy or tweet one of us.
  • Link up one post, old or new (sponsored and review posts are welcome but not other linky's please) that relate to children over the age of 10 years (Tweens, Teens or young adult children) and midlife.
  • Tweet us @motherofteensuk, @DrSharonParry1 and @nickykentisbeer
  • Comment on the hosts' posts and AT LEAST one other of your choice using the linky hashtag #TweensTeensBeyond 
  • Share any posts that you love, we are all about sharing!

What we will do for you:

  • All three of us will comment on your post and share it on Twitter.
  • Your post will be pinned to the #TweensTeensBeyond Linky Pinterest Board
  • Each week, we will select our favourite post which will be featured on all of our sites and shared on Social Media
  • By entering the link you are agreeing to be added to the email reminder list.  (You can request to be removed at any time!)

 

Mother of <a  href= Teenagers" />

 

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